Did the Ministry of Defence dismiss evidence of aliens?

Did the Ministry of Defence ignore evidence of aliens? Government’s review of ‘Britain’s X-files’ containing more than a decade of UFO sightings was biased, claims expert

  • Claim comes from  Dr David Clarke, a research fellow at Sheffield Hallam Uni
  • Government’s DI55 office undertook a huge study of UFO sightings in 1997
  • Dr Clarke says the report was intended from the outset to free the Ministry of Defence from having to investigate UFO sightings

Half a century on from the suspected alien-craft crash at Roswell in New Mexico, the world had become gripped by UFO-mania.

It was the late 90s, and Britain’s Defence Intelligence Staff were being sent countless requests from the public to look into potential sightings across the country.

As a result, analysts at the government’s DI55 office undertook a huge study of UFO sightings to discover if there was anything worth investigating.

Now, the man who is credited with unearthing ‘Britain’s X-files’ has claimed that the government’s work at this time was far from objective.

Dr David Clarke, a research fellow and lecturer in journalism at Sheffield Hallam University, says the report was intended from the outset to free the Ministry of Defence from having to investigate UFO sightings.

As a result, many genuine sighting may not have been properly investigated.

Dr David Clarke, a research fellow and lecturer in journalism at Sheffield Hallam University, claims a government report into alien sightings was intended from the outset to free the Ministry of Defence from having to investigate UFO sightings
Dr David Clarke, a research fellow and lecturer in journalism at Sheffield Hallam University, claims a government report into alien sightings was intended from the outset to free the Ministry of Defence from having to investigate UFO sightings

According to an in-depth report by The Guardian, internal government messages show that the report focused only ‘on the possible threat to the UK [from hostile foreign powers] and technology acquisition’ and not ‘X-Files activities such as alien abductions’.

A separate memo in ‘Project Condign’ says: ‘It shouldn’t be driven by a UFO thesis.’

‘The last three UFO files produced by the UK’s defence intelligence branch DI55 were originally with-held from the records earmarked for transfer to The National Archives as part of the open government project that ran from 2008-13,’ writes Dr Clarke in his blog.

Dr Clarke managed to get hold of these in January ahead of their transfer to the UK National Archives in Kew.

The files, which run to more than 2,500 pages, paint a ‘fascinating picture’ of the debates that took place in Whitehall during 1997.

‘The increasing media attention given to this subject in recent months has almost doubled the work of the desk officers involved to the detriment of other tasks more directly relevant to the work of the branch,’ one memo says.

Shown here is an example of a 'UFO' triangle formation that the government investigated as part of its report into alien sightings
Shown here is an example of a ‘UFO’ triangle formation that the government investigated as part of its report into alien sightings
Internal government messages show that the report focused only 'on the possible threat to the UK [from hostile foreign powers] and technology acquisition' and not 'X-Files activities such as alien abductions'
Internal government messages show that the report focused only ‘on the possible threat to the UK [from hostile foreign powers] and technology acquisition’ and not ‘X-Files activities such as alien abductions’

It claims that it was now time to ‘reappraise the situation’ and clarify DIS’s role in the issue.

‘The problem is unlikely to subside, especially as the US brings into service over the next decade high flying capabilities such as Global Star, Dark Star, the X-33 and, should it come to fruition, the manned spaceplane,’ writes one senior officer

Continue Reading: Did the Ministry of Defence dismiss evidence of aliens?

By Ellie Zolfagharifard

via Mail Online 

Photo credit: Simon Hadleigh-Sparks on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-ND

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